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Tuesday, October 30, 2012

Ali Velshi Gets Pummeled By Hurricane Sandy (VIDEO)


Hurricane Sandy vs. CNN's Ali Velshi

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CNN's Ali Velshi quickly became one of the stars of the coverage of Hurricane Sandy on Monday, as he reported from Atlantic City in the heart of the storm.



The network put Velshi through his paces. Battered by harsh winds and driving rain, he endured lectures from the city's mayor, oncoming cars and even a group of shirtless men invading his live shots.

"It's incredibly dangerous where you are," anchor Brooke Baldwin told him at one point during the day.

"There's some cars coming here," he said, running across the street to get out of the way.

Velshi reappeared on CNN over and over and over again, through the midnight hour. His extreme reporting provoked a major reaction on Twitter. Many wondered why CNN had him where he was.

"Dear CNN, please let Ali Velshi GO INSIDE BEFORE HE BLOWS AWAY AND DIES. OMG," fashion bloggers The Fug Girls wrote.

"Ali Velshi is getting pummeled live on CNN in Atlantic City. Cut the live feed and go inside, for God's sake," NPR's Andy Carvin chimed in.

Even Lorenzo Langford, the mayor of Atlantic City told Velshi to get off the streets, saying that "self-preservation" was important.

The debate over whether Velshi should have been outside tapped into the larger debate that always emerges when hurricane coverage takes over newscasts. The usual charge is that networks load the reporting with sensationalist graphics and music and that the reporters are sent into massive storms more for entertainment purposes than for informational ones.

Velshi's response -- a version of which he reiterated over and over again during his segments -- was that he knew what he was doing.

"We've done this before, and we know how to keep safe," he said about an hour later, adding that he wanted to show people how dangerous the situation was.

That echoes the arguments made by television executives and other reporters when asked why in the world they are going directly into harm's way. David Verdi, senior vice president of newsgathering at NBC News, told the Washington Post's Erik Wemple on Monday that networks treat hurricanes like war zones.

"The reason we're on beaches and boardwalks is twofold: One is to convey the seriousness and two, because it hits the beach first," he said. "That's the reason we go into war zones and go to special events and places to where we can gain access to places that regular people cannot."

This photo provided by the U.S. Coast Guard shows the HMS Bounty, a 180-foot sailboat, submerged in the Atlantic Ocean during Hurricane Sandy approximately 90 miles southeast of Hatteras, N.C., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. The Coast Guard rescued 14 of the 16 crew members by helicopter. Hours later, rescuers found one of the missing crew members, but she was unresponsive. They are still searching for the captain. (AP Photo/U.S. Coast Guard, Petty Officer 2nd Class Tim Kuklewski)

Consolidated Edision trucks are submerged on 14th Street near the ConEd power plant, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Sandy knocked out power to at least 3.1 million people, and New York's main utility said large sections of Manhattan had been plunged into darkness by the storm, with 250,000 customers without power as water pressed into the island from three sides, flooding rail yards, subway tracks, tunnels and roads. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)



Sea water floods the Ground Zero construction site, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain.

Lower Manhattan goes dark during superstorm Sandy, on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, as seen from the Brooklyn Heights promenade in the Brooklyn borough of New York. One World Trade Center, background center, remains brightly lit. Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain.


Streets are flooded under the Manhattan Bridge in the Dumbo section of Brooklyn, N.Y., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012.Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain.








PIC'S  AFTER HURRICANE SANDY
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Via: HuffingTonPost

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