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Monday, May 27, 2013

'Let Us Not Forget,' Obama Says As U.S. Marks Memorial Day



President Obama speaks during a Memorial Day ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va.


Americans gathered at cemeteries, memorials and monuments nationwide to honor fallen military service members on Memorial Day, at a time when combat in Afghanistan approaches 12 years and the ranks of World War II veterans dwindles.

President Obama laid a wreath Monday at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery across the Potomac River from Washington.

"Let us not forget as we gather here today that our nation is still at war," Obama said.

"When they give their lives, they are still being laid to rest in cemeteries in quiet corners across our country, including here in Arlington," he said. He told the stories of three soldiers who had died. Each had been devoted to their mission and were praised by others for saving lives.

Earlier in the morning, he and first lady Michelle Obama hosted a breakfast at the White House with "Gold Star" families of service members who have been killed.

Another wreath-laying ceremony was planned at Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park on the southern tip of Roosevelt Island in New York City. The park is a tribute to President Roosevelt's famous speech calling for all people to enjoy freedom of speech, freedom of worship, freedom from want and freedom from fear.

At the National World War II Museum in New Orleans, about 30 bicyclists clustered around World War II veteran and museum volunteer Tom Blakey, a paratrooper in the 82nd Airborne Division who jumped at Normandy on D-Day — June 6, 1944 — and in May 1945 helped liberate the work camp at Wobbelin in northwest Germany.

"Most of us wondered why we were there, killing people and being killed," he said. "We didn't do anything to deserve it. When we got to that camp and saw what was there, the lights came on."

The cycling group makes regular weekend training runs, and on Monday started a Memorial Day ride about seven miles away at the national cemetery in Chalmette, where the Battle of New Orleans — the last in the War of 1812 — was fought.

"I'm glad I took this ride to hear a personal story," Scott Gumina, 41, said. "Hearing one man's account of his personal experience was pretty impressive to me."

Across much of New England, several days of heavy rain gave way to sunny skies for parades in towns large and small.

In Portland, Maine, kids and even pets displayed the Stars and Stripes as veterans, youth groups law enforcement officials and civic organizations paraded to Monument Square to the tunes of a marching band, sirens from a police car and the rumble of motorcycles.

"It's a very important day, not only for the Veteran of Foreign Wars but every veteran organization, every branch of the service, and every patriot in general — every American. This day is hugely significant and should never be forgotten," said David Olson, 66, of Portland, the VFW's state senior vice commander.

He said he was pleased to see a large turnout of youngsters, both in the parade and along the parade route. "As they get older, they'll realize exactly why we do this," he said.

For some veterans, it was a somber event.

Richard Traiser, a Marine injured when his tank came under attack in Vietnam, helped deliver a three-volley salute with the Marine Corps League.

Memorial Day gives those who served an opportunity to get together and remember friends who didn't make it.

"I think about them a lot, especially the people I lost in my platoon," Traiser said. "A couple of kids were 19 years old. I don't dwell on it in a morbid way, but it's on your mind."

In Connecticut, a Waterford man who was killed in the Vietnam War was honored with a hometown park area named for him. Arnold E. Holm Jr., nicknamed "Dusty," was killed when his helicopter was shot down on June 11, 1972. A group of at least 100 dedicated the park this weekend.

In suburban Boston, veterans gathered in a park to mark Memorial Day this year rather than hold a parade because of failing health and dwindling numbers. The city of Beverly called off its parade because so few veterans would be able to march. The parade has been a fixture in the town since the Civil War.

In Atlanta, a dedication of the History Center's redone Veterans Park was scheduled for early evening. Soil from major battlefields will be scattered by veterans around the park's flagpole.

The holiday weekend also marked the traditional start of the U.S. vacation season. AAA, one of the nation's largest leisure travel agencies, expected 31.2 million Americans to hit the road over the weekend, virtually the same number as last year. Gas prices were about the same as last year, up 1 cent to a national average of $3.65 a gallon Friday.

Via:NPR

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

Microsoft's Xbox One Raises Questions About Apple's Mysterious TV Plans

PHOTO: Microsoft's Xbox One interface.






On Tuesday Microsoft unveiled the next generation of its Xbox – the Xbox One. The One though isn't just a gaming system as the Xbox has long been – it's an "all-in-one" entertainment system. 
The new console integrates with a cable box, will have streaming video capabilities, and also original Xbox video content, including a Halo TV series made by Steven Spielberg. It promises to loop your cable box into the interactive Xbox experience, allowing you to channel surf via voice control and video chat while watching TV and movies. 

The Xbox One will face the gaming competition from the likes of Nintendo and Sony when it comes out at the end of the year, but many have also been pointing out another competitor that has long been rumored to focus on cracking the living room tech problem: Apple. 

"Steve Jobs' Dream Device Has Arrived, and It's Made by Microsoft" a headline on Slate reads. "Microsoft's new Xbox One is an Apple killer, the living room," Quartz wrote. "Did Microsoft Just Kick Apple Out of the Living Room?" Mashable asked

Apple now sells Apple TV, a box which hooks up to a TV and allows users to download movies and TV shows from iTunes as well as stream video through services like Netflix and Hulu Plus. However, Apple has long been rumored to be building a more advanced Apple TV product, one that might actually be HDTV. It's the long-rumored iTV, as some have called it.

In Walter Isaacson's "Steve Jobs," the Apple founder told Issacson of his plans to crack the TV space. Isaacson quotes Jobs in the book: "'I'd like to create an integrated television set that is completely easy to use,' he told me. 'It would be seamlessly synced with all of your devices and with iCloud.' No longer would users have to fiddle with complex remotes for DVD players and cable channels. 'It will have the simplest user interface you could imagine. I finally cracked it.'" 

Microsoft's Xbox One has some of those simple interface features. You can change the channel or navigate the interface by speaking aloud through voice control software or simply wave your hand to move through menus. You can also use a tablet or smartphone to control the interface on the TV. Speculation about Apple TV has persisted for a long time, pointing to a late 2013 or early 2014 release. "When I go into my living room and turn on the TV, I feel like I have gone backwards in time by 20 to 30 years," Tim Cook, the CEO of Apple, said in December. "It's an area of intense interest. I can't say more than that." 

Sure, Apple's future TV product is no more than rumors and illusions right now, but still the technology industry is bubbling about what the tech giant could do. "Apple is already in this space with media and Apple TV. They already have the software hooks to extend to games on Apple TV but I think they are struggling to get the experience where they want it," Patrick Moorhead, an analyst at Moor Insights & Strategy, told ABC News. 

What Apple might have from the media and software end, it might lack in the gaming realm against the big players like Microsoft, Sony and Nintendo. However, analysts point to Apple's hugely popular gaming devices out right now: the iPhone and iPad. 

"Apple could have a real advantage here mainly because of their scale and penetration," Brain Blau, Research Director of Consumer Technology at Gartner, told ABC News. While Blau said he couldn't speculate too much on what Apple would do in the game space, he did suggest some natural extensions.


Thursday, May 9, 2013

Jodi Arias guilty of 1st-degree murder


Family and friends of Travis Alexander straightened their backs, edging forward on their seats in the anxious moments before the verdict was read.
The jury foreman handed the verdict to Maricopa County Superior Court Judge Sherry Stephens, who scanned it, then handed it to the court clerk to read out loud. 
Then gasps and sighs pierced the silence in Courtroom 5C when it was announced that the jurors had found Jodi Arias guilty of premeditated murder. 
Several of Arias’ family members wiped away tears. Her mother, Sandra Arias, sat stoically.
Across the aisle, the victim’s family and friends, wearing blue wristbands and ribbons that read “Justice for Travis,” sobbed and held each other. 
Months of testimony drew an international audience that waited impatiently for the verdict. The sensational murder trial will resume today at 1 p.m., as the same jury decides whether Arias deserves the death penalty or life in prison.
In a post-conviction interview with the local Fox TV station, Arias said she prefers a death sentence and she believed the worst outcome would be to spend the rest of her life in prison.
Based on her statements during the interview, Arias was placed on suicide watch, according to the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office.
Arias admitted killing Alexander on June 4, 2008. Alexander, a 30-year-old motivational speaker and legal insurance salesman, was found in the shower of his Mesa home five days later — shot in the head and stabbed 27 times, with his throat slit ear to ear.
After the verdict was read on Wednesday, Arias, 32, fought hard to hold back tears as Judge Stephens polled the jurors on their decision. All 12 said she was guilty of premeditated murder. Seven also thought she was guilty of felony murder, meaning that they believe Arias entered Alexander’s home with the intent to commit a crime. Both counts can carry the death penalty.
The jurors’ faces were solemn as the verdict was about to be read. One female juror took a deep breath, and a male juror bowed his head. 
While Alexander’s supporters cheered the verdict, the news was a blow for Arias’ relatives.
“I’m very upset about it, but I have to live with it. There’s nothing I can do about it,” said Jodi Arias’ grandfather, Sonny Allen, by phone from his home in Yreka, Calif. “I don’t think she deserves death.”
Allen’s daughter, Jodi Arias’ aunt, Sue Ann Halterman, called him about the verdict shortly after it was read, he said. Allen added that it had come as a complete shock to him when police came to his house to arrest his granddaughter in July 2008.
“To tell you the truth, I would never have believed she’d have done it if she hadn’t confessed. She didn’t want to kill anything; she wouldn’t even kill a damn yellowjacket,” he said.
Alexander’s siblings also released a statement through the Phoenix law firm of Buesing, Hernacki & Beckstead PLLC, in which they pledged to file a wrongful death civil suit against Arias. They thanked the public for “the outpouring of support” and asked for privacy through the sentencing phase. 
David Hughes, a friend of Alexander who also knew Arias, said that when the verdict was read “it felt like everything was going in slow motion.”
“Everybody was so happy at the verdict,” he said of the family members and friends. He said he looked at Jodi Arias after the verdict was read. “She had no emotion … but after the way she’s behaved the last five years, it didn’t surprise me.”
Chris Hughes, David’s brother and also a friend of Alexander’s, said he was pleased with the verdict. He was in the courtroom and met with the family.
“I’ve got faith in the jury. They did a great job,” Chris Hughes said. “It’s been five years — a long time coming.”
Noting that Arias once said on TV that no jury would ever convict her, Hughes added: “This jury did convict her.”
Outside the courtroom, a crowd of a few hundred people erupted in cheers after the verdict. Some held homemade signs in support of Alexander and took commemorative photos in front of the courthouse.
Dave Hall, a friend of Alexander’s, shouted, “Justice for Travis! Justice for Travis!”
“Five years of waiting for this, of her stalling this out, trying to get out of this, lying, manipulating,” he said. “Now the citizens of Arizona have seen her lies, they’ve spoken in unison, and they don’t buy any of her garbage.”
Regarding Arias’ seeming lack of reaction to her verdict, he said, “You have to be callous with your emotions if you can slit another person’s throat, stab him in the back and then go make out with somebody else. She’s an animal.”
When the jury meets today, they will begin considering aggravating factors that would make Arias eligible for the death penalty and must unanimously agree on Arias’ sentence. The judge does not have authority to override the jury’s decision.
The prosecution alleged cruelty as an aggravating factor in Arias’ case. For a finding of cruelty, the jury must agree that the victim, while conscious, experienced mental and physical pain and that the defendant knew or should have known that the victim would suffer, said Dale Baich, an assistant federal public defender in Phoenix who handles capital case appeals and is not involved in the Arias case. 
If the state has proven beyond a reasonable doubt that the crime was especially cruel, then the trial moves into the penalty phase with one of three options: death, 25 years to life in prison, or life in prison without the possibility of parole. 
If the jury does not find an aggravator, then the judge imposes a sentence of either 25 years to life in prison or life without the possibility of parole, Baich said.
During the penalty phase, the defense will have the opportunity to present “mitigating factors,” or reasons to show leniency for Arias. 
Republic reporters Anne Ryman, Bob Ortega, Sean Holstege, JJ Hensley and Michael Kiefer contributed to this article.

 
 Jodi Arias


Jodi Arias says she prefers death penalty


PHOENIX — Jodi Arias spent 18 days on the stand sharing intimate, emotional and oftentimes X-rated details of her life before a rapt television and online audience. She had hoped it all might convince a jury that she killed her one-time boyfriend in self-defense.

But the eight men and four women on the panel didn't buy it, convicting Arias of first-degree murder after only about 15 hours of deliberations. Jurors will return to court Thursday to begin the next phase of the trial that could set the stage for Arias receiving a death sentence.

It's a punishment that Arias herself says she wants, telling a TV station minutes after her conviction that she would "prefer to die sooner than later."
"Longevity runs in my family, and I don't want to spend the rest of my natural life in one place," a tearful Arias told Fox affiliate KSAZ. "I believe death is the ultimate freedom and I'd rather have my freedom as soon as I can get it."
The case elevated the unknown waitress and aspiring photographer to a household name, with a real-life story of love, betrayal and murder far more alluring than any made-for-TV movie. The crime itself was enough to grab headlines: Arias, a 32-year-old high school dropout, shot Travis Alexander in the forehead, stabbed him nearly 30 times and slit his throat from ear to ear, leaving the motivational speaker and businessman nearly decapitated.
She claimed he attacked her and she fought for her life. Prosecutors said she killed out of jealous rage after Alexander wanted to end their affair and planned to take a trip to Mexico with another woman.
Arias' four-month trial quickly became a media sensation — ratings gold for cable networks that could broadcast from inside the courtroom and feed an insatiable public appetite for true-crime drama delivered live and up-close. It was, for many, the horrible train wreck they just couldn't turn away from, even though they know they should.
Arias fought back tears as the verdict was announced Wednesday in the hushed, packed courtroom, while Alexander's family members wept and hugged each other. They wore blue ribbons and wristbands with the words "Justice For Travis." The family thanked prosecutor Juan Martinez and a key witness and said it appreciated the outpouring of support from the public.
Outside, a huge crowd that had gathered on the courthouse steps screamed, whistled and cheered the news in a case that has attracted fans from across the country who traveled to Phoenix to be close to the proceedings.
Alexander's friend Chris Hughes said he was happy with the verdict, pointing out a bold proclamation that Arias made in one of her jailhouse interviews that she wouldn't be found guilty.
"She said, 'No jury would convict me. Mark my words.' This jury convicted her," Hughes said. "Luckily we had 12 smart jurors. They nailed it."
When asked about Alexander's family, Arias told the station (http://bit.ly/15qG7aP), "I just hope that now that a verdict has been rendered, that they'll be able to find peace."
The Maricopa County Sheriff's Office said no more media interviews with Arias would be granted. She has been placed on suicide watch.
Testimony in Arias' trial began in early January. The trial quickly snowballed into a made-for-the-tabloids drama, garnering daily coverage from cable news networks and spawning a virtual cottage industry for talk shows, legal experts and even Arias, who used her notoriety to sell artwork she made in jail.
The trial now moves into the so-called aggravation phase during which prosecutors will argue the killing was committed in an especially cruel, heinous and depraved manner that should allow jurors to consider the death penalty. Both sides may call witnesses and show evidence. If the panel finds the aggravating factors exist, the trial then moves into the final penalty phase during which jurors will recommend either life in prison or death.
Despite her comments about wanting to die, it's up to the jury to decide whether to recommend death.
Authorities said Alexander fought for his life as Arias attacked him in a blitz, but he soon grew too weak to defend himself.
"Mr. Alexander did not die calmly," Martinez told jurors in opening statements.
Arias said she recalled Alexander attacking her in a fury after a day of sex. She said Alexander came at her "like a linebacker," body-slamming her to the tile floor. She managed to wriggle free and ran into his closet to retrieve a gun he kept on a shelf. She said she fired in self-defense but had no memory of stabbing him.
She acknowledged trying to clean the scene of the killing, dumping the gun in the desert and working on an alibi to avoid suspicion. She said she was too scared and ashamed to tell the truth. However, none of Arias' allegations that Alexander had physically abused her in the months before his death, that he owned a gun and had sexual desires for young boys, were corroborated by witnesses or evidence during the trial. She acknowledged lying repeatedly before and after her arrest but insisted she was telling the truth in court.
Arias spent 18 days on the witness stand describing an abusive childhood, cheating boyfriends, dead-end jobs, a shocking sexual relationship with Alexander, and her contention that he had grown physically violent.
A defense expert later testified that Arias suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder and dissociative amnesia, which explained why she couldn't recall much from the day of the killing. Another defense witness concluded that Arias was a battered woman.
Martinez worked feverishly to attack the credibility of the defense experts, accusing them of having sympathy for Arias and offering biased opinions.
Aside from her lies, Arias had another formidable obstacle to overcome.
Her grandparents had reported a .25-caliber handgun stolen from their Northern California home about a week before Alexander's death — the same caliber used to shoot him — but Arias insisted she didn't take it. Authorities believe she brought it with her to kill him. The coincidence of the same caliber gun stolen from the home also being used to shoot Alexander was never resolved.
Meanwhile, the entire case devolved into a circus-like spectacle attracting dozens of enthusiast each day to the courthouse as they lined up for a chance to score just a few open public seats in the gallery. One trial regular sold her spot in line to another person for $200. Both got reprimands from the court, and the money was returned.
Many people also gathered outside after trial for a chance to see Martinez, who had gained celebrity-like status for his firebrand tactics and unapologetically intimidating style of cross-examining defense witnesses.
The case grew into a worldwide sensation as thousands followed the trial via a live, unedited Web feed. Twitter filled with comments as spectators expressed their opinions on everything from Arias' wardrobe to Martinez's angry demeanor. For its fans, the Arias trial became a live daytime soap opera.
 


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Wednesday, May 8, 2013

Kidnapped Woman Amanda Berry, Daughter Return Home to Sister's Residence

Cheers greeted a motorcade that escorted Amanda Berry and her daughter today as the woman returned home after enduring a decade of captivity in a Cleveland house. 

Berry and her 6-year-old daughter, Jocelyn, were ushered into the house through a back door out of the view of cameras. She is expected to "freshen up," and then emerge on the porch to make a statement, Commander Thomas McCartney, of the Cleveland Police Department told reporters.

She came home to the house of her sister Beth. The front porch and bushes are festooned with balloons and teddy bears and a phalanx of press out front. 

McCartney told the media, "Remember this is Amanda's day. She is calling the shots... It's Amanda's rules today." 

Berry is credited as being the "hero" after she made a brave bolt to freedom on Monday with her daughter by her side. Berry's 911 call led authorities to the home on Seymour Avenue where she and two other women were allegedly kept for a decade. 

Watch live here Amanda's homecoming was something her family and law enforcement said they never stopped believing would one day happen. 

"Hope is alive today and our dreams have been answered," McCartney said. 

The original missing flyer showing Amanda and a yellow ribbon were tied to a tree outside the home.
Nearby was a sign that said, "Wish it. Dream it."

Berry's Call to Her Grandmother
Twenty-four hours after making an emotional call to police following her daring escape from 10 years of captivity, Berry made a far different call to family members in Tennessee to let them know she is "glad to be back." 

The elation among family members and friends stretched well beyond the home where Berry, 27, and two other women -- Gina DeJesus, 23, and Michele Knight, 32 -- were allegedly held captive on Seymour Avenue in Cleveland.

Berry called her grandmother Fern Gentry of Elizabethton, Tenn., Tuesday to say that the little girl in the hospital photo is her 6-year-old daughter, Jocelyn, according to ABC News affiliate WEWS-TV, which was present during the call. 

"Is the little girl your baby?" Gentry asked. 

"Yeah, she's my daughter, she was born on Christmas," Berry said. 

Many of Berry's relatives, including her grandparents and father, now live in Tennessee. Some of Berry's younger cousins only know her through pictures and stories told by other family members.

Berry went missing at age 16 in 2003 while on her way home from a job at Burger King. 

"I'm glad to have you back," grandmother Gentry said to Berry. 

"I'm glad to be back," Berry said. 

Berry's father, John, said he had a short conversation with her Tuesday and through his darkest days, he always knew his daughter was alive. 

 
"I didn't think she was dead. No, never," Berry said. "Keep hope. Keep hope. Don't give up till you know because I never gave up." 

Berry said he knew deep down in his heart that his daughter's "rough and tough" attitude would keep her alive. That's why he spent years putting posters up in every store window, knowing he would one day get that call. 

His former wife, Louwana Miller, worked hard to bring their daughter home, pleading with authorities to follow every tip. Miller died in 2006 at the age of 43 after being hospitalized with pancreatitis. Berry suspects she died of a broken heart. 

Berry, who is recovering from back surgery, finally received that long-awaited call from a Cleveland relative after his daughter broke through a door and bolted toward freedom. 
 
"There's no way to explain. It's the best thing that ever happened to me. Best feeling I ever had," Berry said. 

Michele Knight, who vanished in 2002 when she was 20, is expected to be released from the hospital later today. Knight's mother, Barbara, revealed that when her daughter disappeared, she filed a police report, but no one took her seriously. 

"I had a caseworker tell me that maybe she doesn't want me to be involved with her life anymore," Knight told Cleveland's Fox affiliate WJW-TV.




Actions of 911 dispatcher  ‘under review’ in Amanda Berry call



The 911 call made by Amanda Berry, one of three kidnap victims who police say were held in a Cleveland basement for a decade, is under review after possible procedural errors by the dispatcher.

"While the call-taker complied with policies and procedures which enabled a very fast response by police, we have noted some concerns which will be the focus of our review, including the call-taker's failure to remain on the line with Ms. Berry until police arrived on the scene," Martin L. Flask, the director of the Cleveland Department of Public Safety told Fox8.com.

In the 911 transcript, the operator interacts with Berry. At one point, after Berry asks for a police, the operator responds, "We're going to send them as soon as we get a car open."

The call ends with the dispatcher assuring Berry that police are en route and said,  'I told you they’re on their way; talk to them when they get there, OK."









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Via: ABCnews
Via: FoxNews

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