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Wednesday, June 19, 2013

James Gandolfini dead at 51

James Gandolfini dead at 51: 'Sopranos' star suffers massive heart attack in Italy

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Actor James Gandolfini is dead at 51. A source tells the Daily News he suffered a massive heart attack in Italy.

James Gandolfini, the New Jersey-bred actor who delighted audiences as mob boss Tony Soprano in “The Sopranos” has died following a massive heart attack in Italy, a source told the Daily News.

“Everyone is in tears,” the source close to the 51-year-old TV tough guy said.

James Gandolfini (center) is best known for his role as Tony in HBO's 'The Sopranos,' acting alongside Tony Sirico (from left), Steven Van Zandt, Michael Imperioli and Vicent Pastore.

James Gandolfini (center) is best known for his role as Tony in HBO's 'The Sopranos,' acting alongside Tony Sirico (from left), Steven Van Zandt, Michael Imperioli and Vicent Pastore.

A press-shy celeb who got his start as a character actor and became famous relatively late in his career — thanks to his breakout role on “The Sopranos,” Gandolfini has largely avoided the spotlight since the last season of the beloved show aired in 2007.

 

James Gandolfini (right) with 'The Sopranos' creator David Chase.

James Gandolfini (right) with 'The Sopranos' creator David Chase.

The burly Westwood, N.J. native has appeared in several supporting roles since then, playing the director of the CIA in “Zero Dark Thirty” and the gruff blue-collar father of a wannabe rock star in “Not Fade Away” last year.

Gandolfini hit Broadway in 2009 with the Tony Award-winning comedy “God of Carnage.”


James Gandolfini and his wife Deborah Lin, who gave birth to a baby girl in October. The couple married in Hawaii in 2008.

James Gandolfini and his wife Deborah Lin, who gave birth to a baby girl in October. The couple married in Hawaii in 2008.

“I seek out good stories, basically — that’s it,” he told The Star-Ledger last December.


James Gandolfini (from left) played a tough-guy mob boss on 'The Sopranos' with costars Steven Van Zandt and Tony Sirico.

James Gandolfini (from left) played a tough-guy mob boss on 'The Sopranos' with costars Steven Van Zandt and Tony Sirico.

“The older I get, the funnier-looking I get, the more comedies I’m offered. I’m starting to look like a toad, so I’ll probably be getting even more soon.”
Gandolfini’s wife, former model Deborah Lin, gave birth to a baby girl last October. The couple married in Hawaii in 2008.


The Sopranos family from the wildly popular HBO drama series 'The Sopranos.' The series ran from 1999 through 2007 and starred Edie Falco (from left), James Gandolfini, Robert Iler and Jamie-Lynn Sigler.

The Sopranos family from the wildly popular HBO drama series 'The Sopranos.' The series ran from 1999 through 2007 and starred Edie Falco (from left), James Gandolfini, Robert Iler and Jamie-Lynn Sigler.

Gandolfini — who spent part of his early career supporting himself as a bartender and nightclub manager — also has a son with his ex-wife, Marcy Wudarski.




Actress Edie Falco (left) and actor James Gandolfini attend the premiere of 'Boardwalk Empire' at the Ziegfeld Theatre in 2010. Falco and Gandolfini played opposites in Broadway's 'God of Carnage' in 2009.

Actress Edie Falco (left) and actor James Gandolfini attend the premiere of 'Boardwalk Empire' at the Ziegfeld Theatre in 2010. Falco and Gandolfini played opposites in Broadway's 'God of Carnage' in 2009.

His first break came in 1992 when he landed a role in a Broadway version of “A Streetcar Named Desire” that starred Alec Baldwin and Jessica Lange.

Smallish parts in major films followed — Gandolfini played a submarine crew member in “Crimson Tide” in 1995 and a gangland bodyguard in “Get Shorty” the same year.




James Gandolfini won three Emmy Awards for his role as Tony Soprano.

James Gandolfini won three Emmy Awards for his role as Tony Soprano.

Fame came for the Italian-American actor after 1999, as “The Sopranos” garnered critical acclaim and cult popularity on its way to becoming a TV classic.

Gandolfini won three Emmy Awards for his sparkling depiction of protagonist Tony Soprano, a mobster trying to balance the mundane stresses of family life and his unusual occupation: organized crime.


Friday, June 14, 2013

Man of Steel


"Man of Steel" critics' reviews: Film wallows in sorrow more than soars


Henry Cavill as Superman and Amy Adams as Lois Lane in "Man of Steel." / Warner Bros.


The reviews are in, and while most movie critics agree that the newest retelling of the classic Superman story is worth seeing, "Man of Steel" is weighed down by pathos and too much kryptonite. 

Featuring Henry Cavill in the red-and-blue tights, and Amy Adams as his love interest, this Zack Snyder-directed story by the "Dark Knight" trilogy's Christopher Nolan and David S. Goyer (with Goyer penning the screenplay), gets bogged down by its own gravity, and lacks the fun and light-heartedness of previous movie and TV versions, according to the critics.


Check out what they had to say below.
Peter Travers, Rolling Stone: "Caught in the slipstream between action and angst, 'Man of Steel' is a bumpy ride for sure. But there's no way to stay blind to its wonders."

Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times: "There's very little humor or joy in this Superman story, and not enough character development for us really to care once the big-budget pyrotechnics are under way."




Henry Cavill, Kevin Costner, Laurence Fishburne talk "Man of Steel"

Ann Hornaday, Washington Post: "For now, audiences can only speculate as to the hidden depths of Cavill, who in Zack Snyder's busy, bombastic creation myth is reduced to little more than a joyless cipher or dazzling physical specimen."

Lisa Kennedy, Denver Post: "The chief problem here is one of rhythm and balance in the storytelling and directing. The movie swings between destructive overstatement and flat-footed homilies."
David Edelstein, New York magazine: ["Man of Steel" offers] "lots of noise and clutter -- but never the simple charm of the original comic by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster or the faintly self-abashed handsomeness of Christopher Reeve. The movie isn't dead on arrival, like Snyder's over-reverent 'Watchmen.' But it's pleasure-free."

Dana Stevens, Slate: "Snyder provides an elegantly illuminated retelling of the origin story of that most saintly of superheroes, Superman."

Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian: "This is a great, big, meaty, chewy superhero adventure, which broadly does what it sets out to do, though at excessive length. What I missed were the gentle, innocent pleasures of Superman's day-to-day crimefighting existence.... Due to the cataclysmic battle in this film, much of the Man of Steel's mystery and novelty have been used up. Subsequent adventures may lose altitude."

Justin Craig, FoxNews.com: "Zack Snyder, Christopher Nolan and David S. Goyer have managed to become Superman's very own Kryptonite, stripping the iconic character of his greatest assets: wit, charm, and most importantly, hope; rendering "Man of Steel" this blockbuster season's biggest disappointment."

Chris Nashawaty, Entertainment Weekly: "'Dark Knight'-style makeover never quite comes together. Sure, Superman is still faster than a speeding bullet and more powerful than a locomotive. ... But he's been transformed into the latest in a long line of soul-searching super-brooders, trapped between his devastated birth planet of Krypton and his adopted new home on Earth. He's just another haunted outsider grappling with issues."
Ty Burr: The Boston Globe: "Snyder knows how to put on a show, and 'Man of Steel' has a massive scope that's hard to resist. ... But what's missing from this Superman saga is a sense of lightness, of pop joy."

Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times: "Given the 'Dark Knight' trilogy's Nolan and Goyer's involvement, it's no surprise that 'Man of Steel' is conceptualized in the Batman mold, a dark end of the street extravaganza where, theoretically at least, epic vision would be joined with dramatic heft. It hasn't worked out quite that way.

Stephanie Zacharek, the Village Voice: "'Man of Steel' is a movie event with an actual movie inside, crying to get out. Despite its preposterous self-seriousness, its overblown, CGI'ed-to-death climax, and its desperate efforts to depict the destruction of, well, everything on Earth, there's greatness in this retelling of the origin of Superman, moments of intimate grandeur, some marvelous, subtle acting, and a superhero costume that's a feat of mad mod genius."



Tags for this Post: reviews, superman, movies, man of steal, dpst cbsmovies



Via:CBSnews

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

iOS 7

Apple unveils overhaul of iOS 7, new iTunes Radio



Apple announced an overhaul to its mobile operating system and a new streaming radio app Monday at the Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC). 

The new iOS 7 design is noticeably flatter, with redesigned icons, buttons, color schemes and slightly translucent-looking keyboard. 

"The biggest change to iOS since the iPhone," Apple CEO Cook said at the Moscone Center in San Francisco.

All of Apple's apps in iOS 7 are getting a reboot. CNET described the new look as panes of glass. The new lock screen and home screen have a clean white look, with a phone's number pad featuring round buttons. 

The Game Center is now simple and white, getting rid of the felt green background its had since launch. Stocks, Compass, Calculator and Weather all have new looks that are are in line with Apple's new clean, flat look. 

Chat bubbles are now missing the shiny, 3D look that has been Apple's signature from the first iPhone. Notifications are now available on the lock screen and have a transparent look.
A new feature called Control Center lets users control settings like brightness, media, AirPlay and apps. Tabs have been redesigned to scroll vertically and are no longer limited to 8 pages. 

The iPhone's Camera app will get live photo filters and the abiblity to share with a select group of friends. Photos will start to be organized into moments, much like iPhoto's events. Friends can now share photos to another users' iCloud stream and videos can now be streamed straight from the cloud. 

Apple also announced an iTunes Radio app that streams music and lets users create custom stations much like Pandora. The new app has integrated some of its features from Genius, the software that learns music taste and builds recommendations upon the data. iTunes Radio users will have access to all of the iTunes catalog - about 26 million tracks. The new app will also be available in iTunes and Apple TV. 

An ad supported version will be free for U.S. customers, but iTunes Match subscribers will not see any ads. 

Apple's iOS 7 beta is available for download today and will run on iPhone 4 and up, iPad 2 or later, iPad mini and the fifth-generation iPod Touch.
© 2013 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.







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Via:CBSnews

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